May 22, 2018

Alzheimer’s Prevention Research Needs Your Help

Alzheimer’s Prevention Research Needs Your HelpDid you know in their quest to discover new treatments for Alzheimer’s, researchers can’t easily find enough of their most precious resource – qualified volunteers? This causes major delays in research, and in some cases, causes studies to fail. For Alzheimer’s researchers and the over 5 million US families facing Alzheimer’s disease, delays and treatment failures deliver unwelcome news. But there’s hope.

Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much –Helen Keller

Alzheimer’s researchers, working together across the nation, want to try a new approach. You, from the comfort of your home, can help.

“This new and easy-to-use, online webstudy will help researchers more efficiently find qualified volunteers for Alzheimer’s prevention studies – accelerating the development of new therapies. These valued volunteers, in turn, will potentially gain access to promising new prevention treatments at research centers across the nation,” says Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, Director of Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health and the Camille and Larry Ruvo Chair for Brain Health and one of the three Principal Investigators involved in the webstudy. “By working together, volunteers and researchers can supply the synergy and momentum needed to change the future of Alzheimer’s disease.”

What is the APT webstudy?

The Alzheimer Prevention Trials Webstudy (APT Webstudy), launched by USC’s Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (USC ATRI), in collaboration with Alzheimer’s researchers across the nation, seeks to develop new tools to identify people at risk for developing Alzheimer’s and provide them access to research studies aimed at prevention.  This free webstudy uses the latest online “cognitive assessment” tools to help detect subtle changes in memory and thinking performance over time. These assessments can help researchers identify people that may be developing changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s, even when they have no noticeable symptoms. These participants can then opt to receive additional evaluation for their risk of developing Alzheimer’s in the future and to learn about Alzheimer’s prevention research near them.

What do I have to do?

Anyone over the age of 50 with an interest in participating in Alzheimer’s clinical research studies is eligible to join.

If you choose to participate in the APT Webstudy:

Ready to raise your hand?

If you, a family member, or a friend would like to learn more about joining the Alzheimer Prevention Trials Webstudy, CLICK HERE

Also, visit our HealthyBrains Clinical Trials page to further explore clinical research and the studies currently enrolling qualified volunteers at Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health.